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by on outgoing president 52 years ago this woke was the role in government in solving america's problems. we'll share with you some of the comments of dwight eisenhower in his farewell address. what is the role in government in solving america's problems. you can join the conversation by giving us a call. you can send us an e-mail at journal at cspan.org. let's begin with the act two second terms for u.s. presidents have been problematic but not cursed. what history will says about how president obama will do. will obama blow another mandate. meanwhile from the hill newspaper there is this words from senator mitch mcconnell after four years of frosty relations senator mcconnell is reaching out to the president. senator mcconnell called on the president to use his inauguration speech to focus on the massive federal debt happeninging over the heads of our children and grandchildren. it is an offer senator mcconnell made four years ago but was soon forgotten. in his editorial he said given the serious nature of the challenge, i hope the president uses his address to acknowledge the seriousness
to be done to preserve this last and greatest bastion of freedom. in this present crisis, government is not the solution to our problem, government is the problem. from time to time we've been tempted to believe that society has become too complex to be managed by self-rule, that government by an elite group is superior to government for, by, and of the people. well, if no one among us is capable of governing himself, then who among us has the capacity to govern someone else? all of us together, in and out of government, must bear the burden. the solutions we seek must be equitable, with no one group singled out to pay a higher price. we hear much of special interest groups. well, our concern must be for a special interest group that has been too long neglected. it knows no sectional boundaries or ethnic and racial divisions, and it crosses political party lines. it is made up of men and women who raise our food, patrol our streets, man our mines and factories, teach our children, keep our homes, and heal us when we're sick -- professionals, industrialists, shopkeepers, clerks, cabbi
interruption to their national insurance contributions. after 13 years when the previous government did nothing -- [shouting] >> does the prime minister think that the announcement this week of a single tear pension will finally deal with this great injustice? >> i think my honorable friend makes an important way. i think the single. pension is an excellent for. i think will have all parties support because it holds out the prospect in 2017 of having a basic state pension over 140 pounds rather than 107 pounds, taking millions of people out of the main set, giving them dignity in retirement, and particularly as he says, helping low-paid people suffer what people, and above all women who have not been able to necessarily a full pension and pass. i hope will have the support of everyone across the house. >> ed miliband. >> mr. speaker, kind of join the prime minister in paying tribute to sapper richard walker, 20 engineer regiment, attached to 21 engineer regiment. he showed the utmost courage and bravery, and all of us have thoughts with his family and friends. i also joined the prime minister i
at the dallas fed said mitt they are the key reason that the accommodative monetary policy and government policies have failed to adequately affect economic recovery. we first wrote an article about this in "the wall street journal" in 2009. put simply, sick banks do not lend. mega banks stop their lending in the capital markets' activity during the crisis of economic recovery. they brought economic growth to a standstill. and then they spread their sickness to the rest of the banking system. congress thought it would address that matter through what is known as the dodd-franc wall street -- the dog frank wall street protection act. -- the dodd-frank wall street protection act. we can test it had that done enough. -- it had not done enough. it exacerbated economic growth by a -- it has benefited many. they are known as lawyers. it has created many new levels of bureaucracy. we believe it has been counterproductive in working against the core problems it seems to address. let me define what i mean when i say to big to fail. the definition is financial firms whose owners, managers, and cust
we want to be the most talented entrepreneurs in america. we have to make sure the government becomes a partner to the federal gunman becomes a partner of the american people. right now, the presentation i have heard in the last month, or two, in america right now, the inability of cities to do proper transportation planning, law-enforcement planning, investments, because we want to know not only what is happening one year from now but 90 days from now. it is not there because we have got to get our fiscal house in order in washington, d.c., and we are excited about it. >> the mayor of columbia, south carolina, a democrat, and the vice president of the u.s. conference of mayors. gentlemen, thank you for being here. guest: thank you. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] >> next, we will show you presidential inauguration speeches. in 1981, ronald reagan was nominated as the 40th president. the former california governor won the election against the incumbent, and at issue was the iran contra crisis, whe
, i think the government could have difficulty defending a law the highest court to consider the assault weapons ban was the u.s. court of appeals for the d.c. circuit and it recently upheld a ban in d.c. the court assumed the weapons were in common use but the ban imposed no real burden on the people's ability to a firearm for self-defense. similarly, it applies to a restriction on high-capacity magazines, which we treat separately than an assault weapons ban. what a ban on the sale of high- capacity magazines, capable of holding more than 10 rounds of ammunition be unconstitutional? i think it is a similar analysis. common use? , used for self-defense? it upheld the restriction on the sale of high-capacity magazines as well. yes, they are probably in common use. yes, there are millions and millions of these high-capacity magazines out there -- however, the court says self-defense typically does not require more than 10 rounds of ammunition. and there remains issues of fit, whether it substantially ferber's -- recent data suggest that the 1994 ban did have an impact, that th
obligations. you can't do that. and that's not a credible way to run this government. we've got to stop lurching from crisis to crisis to crisis, when there's this clear path ahead of us that simply requires some discipline, some responsibility and some compromise. that's where we need to go. that's how this needs to work. major garrett. >> thank you, mr. president. as you well know, sir, finding votes for the debt ceiling can sometimes be complicated. you, yourself, as a member of the senate, voted against a debt ceiling increase. and in previous aspects of american history -- president reagan in 1985, president george herbert walker bush in 1990, president clinton in 1997 -- all signed deficit reduction deals that were contingent upon or in the context of raising the debt ceiling. you, yourself, four times have done that. three times, those were related to deficit reduction or budget maneuvers. what chuck and i and i think many people are curious about is this new, adamant desire on your part not to negotiate, when that seems to conflict with the entire history in the modern era of am
. they are the branch of government to preserve this form of government. there is something very reassuring about this notion that every four years, whether it is your candidate or your opponent, they will be gone after a certain length of time, and that is the celebration of the in and out of the presidency that makes it so important. we can date our collection to these brass buttons that were made for george washington's first inauguration in new york city. they are a simple brass disk, often with the letters g w on them, and you could pin it to your close or sell it on. it demonstrates the relationship between the presidency and the citizenry, which is really the key, and really when inaugurations are part of. there are these wonderful smash- ups -- part coronation, part celebration of american democracy. that relationship is really key. they are also celebrations of national unity, and there is a little bit of partisan gloating. one of our great treasures is this flag from thomas jefferson's first inauguration in 1800. you can see, looking at this banner, what it says -- the eagle holds these
an opportunity. it starts with public education. >> how many total years have you worked in government? >> a lot. since 1981, really. i was a civil rights attorney. i dealt with gender discrimination. a disability rights law had just come into law not long before i had joined. that was very good experience that led to my next government job with bob dole, 1981. the senate turned republican. at the top of the list was the voters' rights. he wanted to make sure he was a player. it was a good fit. >> did you agree with him in most things? >> i did. people tend to identify me with the progressive camp. i hate labels. i have taken strong stances. i am a conservative in one sense. i believe in capitalism but believe that system has to be policed and regulated. it is popular. i think it is one that was reflective of both politics. the tax reform act. i enabled it to be lower for everyone. the compromise that fixed social security for years. a benefit to cut and tax increases. that was bipartisan leadership that we needed and had. his service to our country and the terrible wounds he suffered gave him a
've got the funding of the government, the so-called sequestered, which is a set of automatic spending cuts that were delayed by two months as part of the fiscal cliff arrangement, and we have the infamous debt ceiling, which will come into play. so we will be seeing a lot of activity in the next few months, debates about people criticize the government, about the size of the deficit, and it a lot of back and forth over these three issues. without going into all the different ramifications, i want to say one word about the debt ceiling, which is not everybody understands what the debt ceiling is about. the debt ceiling -- raising the debt ceiling, which congress has to do periodically, gives the government the ability to pay its existing bills. it does not create new deficits. it does not create new spending. so not raising the debt ceiling is sort of like a family which is trying to improve its credit ratings and i know how we can save money, we will not pay our credit card bills. not the most effective way to improve your credit rating. it was a very slow solution to the debt ceiling
and government reform committee. host: good morning. house members have returned to washington with votes slated later today for emergency aid for victims of superstorm sandy. new york is poised to become the first state to act in response to the mass shooting in newtown, connecticut, keeping guns out of the hands of the mentally ill and banning assault weapons. president obama has in hand to the recommendations from joe biden on gun-control and will push for action. the front page of the washington journal says president obama escalates the fight on the w economy. is the debt ceiling negotiable? your thoughts? send us a tweet or post your comment on facebook. you can also send us an e-mail. president obama held his last official news conference of the first term yesterday in the east room of the white house. here's what he had to say on the debt ceiling debate. [video clip] >> republicans and congress have two choices. they can act responsibly and pay america's bills or they can act irresponsibly and put america through another economic crisis. but they will not collect ransomed in exchange for
." this inauguration ceremony marks a new beginning, a new dedication within our government, and a new spirit among us all. a president may sense and proclaim that new spirit, but only a people can provide it. two centuries ago, our nation's birth was a milestone in the long quest for freedom. but the bold and brilliant dream which excited the founders of this nation still awaits its consummation. i have no new dream to set forth today, but rather urge a fresh faith in the old dream. ours was the first society openly to define itself in terms of both spirituality and human liberty. it is that unique self-definition which has given us an exceptional appeal, but it also imposes on us a special obligation to take on those moral duties which, when assumed, seem invariably to be in our own best interests. you have given me a great responsibility--to stay close to you, to be worthy of you, and to exemplify what you are. let us create together a new national spirit of unity and trust. your strength can compensate for my weakness, and your wisdom can help to minimize my mistakes. let us learn together and lau
for by the government. once the president leaves and heads to the white house, his committee has got to pay for everything. the paper all things related -- they pay for all things related to the balls. raising the funds for private sources to underwrite what is going on. ronald reagan gets a lot credit for moving the inauguration when he did not move the inauguration. he moved the inauguration of four years later. that was in 1985. it was below 7 degrees. it was a bitter cold day in washington. the reagan white house the night before looking at the weather forecast thought it was cruel and unusual punishment to make people outside in this weather. they call the chairman of the rules committee and the inaugural committee and said, we think it should be moved aside to the rotunda. being part of a joint committee, he thought the best thing was to call tip o'neill. it was finally tracked down in a bar where he was watching a basketball game kindre. said, it is his inauguration he should have it where he wants it. congress cooperated and move it aside. -- moved it inside. most people saw it on t
. tonko: people have said that there is a need for government, they want effective government, efficient government. well, i think when we look at some of the data that are collected, representative garamendi, it is important for us to acknowledge that as we rebuild in our areas that have been damaged by mother nature, you don't just replace, you need to improve upon the situation. for instance, if there are data that are telling us that more and more water volume is expected in certain watershed areas, as in my district, it would be foolish to spend tax dollars, the hard-earned taxpayer dollars, and simply replace an infrastructure, a bridge, at the same height, at the same span if in fact we know that the water and the force of that water is growing with time. and so these are the ways to, i think, incorporate the soundness of academics and analyses that go into how we respond to this. and if much of it is driven by climate change, global warming, some of the impacts of mother nature that are causing these disruptive scenarios, then ought we not look at sound policy that then stretches
in government today. marcia mcnutt has worked with me for many, many occasions, most notably during the oil spill. you're looking at one of the fine leaders that worked with the government to make decisions matter and make the difficult decisions. i'm proud to work with her during the oil spill and i'm proud to introduce her now. marcia? >> thank you. the gulf coast is under threats and in particular, i want to speak of those that impact life and property. it is a deadly combination of loss of natural protection, rising seas from global warming, increasing intensity and number of storms, and more people and critical infrastructure that lies in the coastal zone in the path of those storms. there's no doubt but the coastal zone is a desirable but it is a dangerous place to live and it is getting more dangerous all the time. so what is the solution? well, the good news is that research can help. let me provide you with an analogy. we know that fault zones are dangerous places to live but thanks to science we have increased more than two orders of nag any attitude the safety of living in earthq
us for so long no longer apply. the question we have today is not whether our government is too big or too small, but whether it works, whether it helps families find jobs at a decent wage, care they can afford, a retirement that is dignified. whether the answer is yes, we intend to move forward. where the answer is no, programs will end. and those of us who manage the public's dollars will be held to account to spend wisely, reform bad habits, and do our business in the light of day because only then can we restore the vital trust between a people and their government. nor is the question before us whether the market is a force for good or ill. its power to generate wealth and expand freedom is unmatched, but this crisis has reminded us that without a watchful eye, the market can spin out of control. a nation cannot prosper long when it favors only the prosperous. the success our economy has always depended not just on the size of our gdp, but on the reach of our prosperity, on our ability to extend opportunity to every willing heart not out of charity, but because it is the surest
will meet our obligation to pass a budget on time, moderate spending, pay bills and keep the government running. most importantly, there will be a plan to slowly, but surely walk our nation out of debt, deficit and declined. on your behalf, we will insist that the democrats to run the rest of washington do the same. this debate is often argued in numbers and figures, but it is really about families like yours that bear the burden of a slow economy, constant uncertainty, and ever-changing government rules that chase jobs and opportunity overseas. one day to day life costs more, and jobs pay less, we do not solve the problem by delaying decisions, raise taxes, or refusing to tackle the most pressing economic challenges. you deserve better. with the swearing in of a new congress and the inauguration of president obama, this is the opportunity for a fresh start, but because government debt affects all of us, republicans will not simply provide a blank check for uncontrolled spending , a rational borrowing, and constant nickel and dime tax increases. the issues that we face today are not an
from the devastation of hurricane sandy. in the wake of large storms like this, governments knee-jerk reaction is often to throw money at forecasting or storm modeling in order to prevent widespread damage in the future. unfortunately, even with the best imaginable system, forecasting systems, we would not have been able to prevent the structural damages which resulted from this particular storm. yet, here we are debating funding for projects due to go online years from now in an emergency supplemental bill, which is meant to provide aid to those who are still suffering in the wake of sandy. fiscal year 2013, the national weather service received a total of $991 million. that's $20 million over their initial request. noaa is expected to ask for additional funding for this particular project over the next two years, nearly $15 million in fiscal year 2014 and $18 million in fiscal year 2015, the year the first new satellite is due to launch. it is appears that the funding included in the frelinghuysen amendment is simply meant to get the grant portion of this project finished just
they are afraid they will spy on them and report information back to the federal government. host: let's go back to what you said at the beginning when you talk about the politics of this. this headline -- that was in reference to what harry reid had said. some democrats backing down from an assault weapons ban. dianne feinstein but to introduce her assault weapons ban in the 113th congress. chris in washington, independence. -- independent. caller: i'm against any more legislation on guns. it's nonsense. we are back to demonizing inanimate objects. if we want to get rid of things that are deadly, ban the automobile. this is nonsense. brady.ed this with a g it did not work. it did not lower crime. that's not the issue. host: what is the issue and where do you see compromise? caller: i don't see compromise. why should this even be an issue? it is a media-driven emergency. other than that, there is none. host: the new york times front page story -- we will go next to dennis in upper marlboro, maryland, democratic caller. caller: good morning. thank you for the opportunity, first of all. the gentle
to start governing from a con seventive perspective. and i don't know what everybody else said about the deal we're going to do tomorrow but i'm actually ok with what leadership is doing right now because they actually have an agenda. the agenda is to get to balance in 10 years, to have a balanced budge, not just to pass a budget that balances in 10 year bus to actually achieve balance in 10 years. if you look at what we're going to do, we're going to pass a three or four-month extension of the debt ceiling. then we're going to get into a fight on the sequester and hold the line of the sequester. this is a promise the leadership is making to us. as long as they keep that promise i think many conservatives will be ok with that. then when we get to the debt ceiling fight we're going to ask for at a minimum the one--- the one-for-one cuts that come from the boehner rule for any long-term debt ceiling extension system of if we look at that, it means that in 10 to 15 years, with very little help from the democrats, we can achieve a balanced budget which is much better than even the 23- to
that the government should not be entangled in this. in other words, taxpayer money should not be going for the provision of abortion. that's one bit of good news. the second bit of good news is, i think, again, those of us who have been here a little while, who have been in these trenches trying to beg and plead for an increase of awareness as to what the consequences of abortion are, young people are recognizing that, again, there's got to be a better way. they've lived with this through their generation. they've seen the scars, seen the wounds, seen the effects on society and they're coming forward and saying women deserve better. can't we be loving enough, can't we be big enough to do something different here? and i think that's a great sign of encouragement for two reasons. one is projecting forward, maybe we can reshape society. but also heal the wounds that have already occurred. because they are substantive indeed. and i think it's important, and young people, i believe, recognize this. they're there saying, don't make this choice. it's a false choice. particularly if you feel c
unconstitutional to begin with. that is neither here nor there. the government has gotten so large and so big, they are involving themselves in everything not important to the average citizen. it is my opinion that what we need to do is to stop all of the stuff the government is getting involved in. the way to do that is through a fair, flat tax. host: we are not really talking about that this morning. we are talking about the gun proposals specifically. what kind of gun do you have? caller: i have more than one because i am a hunter. i enjoy hunting. again, back to what we were saying before. that is about all i want to say about it. i think mr. obama and the congress both do not have a clue about what is going on out here in the real world. host: adalfo, what are your thoughts? caller: when i went to high school there was a police presence at all times. the sheriffs are the -- in charge of the campus. in regards to the president's comments, i think there are far reaching and might be unconstitutional. i helped john boehner and mitch mcconnell work hard to prevent him -- i hope john boehner
lowered their expectations -- there's always debate about what the proper role of government ought to be. i suspect it will have more of that in the coming days about what the proper role government should be -- what are our expectations? are they too low? some of my friends on the right will see the opposite -- the expectations of government are too high. talk to me about expectations -- what do we have a right to the world? >> i think it is important what they were saying about what should be done -- it is not theory, it is actually being done in countries around the world with demonstrated, proven results. every child in many countries in europe start out with that preschool. the results are that unlike this country, there is not hereditary poverty. it is proven -- this is not a theory. what you are saying about the health system is completely proven. our health system costs an extra $750 billion a year for exactly the same services that you would get in other countries. at the institute of medicine issued a report that the waste and fraud that comes from this for-profit system is 5%
additional tax incentives. finally, and most important, we should have the federal government lead by example. the department of energy's management of four large marketing agency should be the gold standard for integrating renewables into the grid, upgrading transmission capacity and leading on conservation. the g.s.a., with over 300 million square feet of federal office space, should demand that all our facilities, every one we at least buy or build, should be of the highest energy efficiency. the federal fleet should be on the cutting edge of fuel efficiency standards. and finally, the department of defense, the largest consumer of energy in the world, needs to redouble its efforts. the pentagon is already moving in the right direction, but it's not just about saving money in the long term. it's providing operational flexibility and reducing velarde nurblet from inefficient and dangerous fossil fuels. those fuel tanker trucks in afghanistan and iraq might as well have had great big bull's eyes on them for terrorists. the military knows this, and we should give maximum support even in a tim
like that. they keep it for one reason only -- so they can protect themselves against the government. that's what it's all about. host: "the new york times" editorial today weighing in saying the white house has a rare chance to propose and pushed through an agenda for public safety. the assault weapon ban should be renewed and tightened with a special emphasis on those that hold more than 10 rounds. offered by our chaplain, father conroy. chaplain conroy: let us pray. god of the universe, we give us thanks for giving us another day. the people's house gathers today and celebrates in its gathering the wonder of our constitutional form of government. our nation has once again achieved something so often lacking in our world history, the peaceful transition of democratic government. the major change of party in control did not take place, it is still the american experience that our streets are peaceful and winners and losers of elections move on with their lives of dignity. we thank you again for the inspiration of our nation's founders and the legacy they left us with. may the member
these people -- caller: all these people who are paranoid to think the government is going to take their guns, they probably use a psychological evaluation. if the government wants to take your guns and your assault weapon isn't going to stop them from doing that. a second opinion is, i hear everyone talk about regulating and background checks on handguns, but what about background checks on ammunition and that would cut back criminals. host: i appreciate your time. mental health issue must be handled very carefully. a counselor and nurse should be on every public school site, not guns. and joseph asked, should ptsd prevent owning a firearm. rick on our republican line. what are your thoughts? caller: i appreciate you taking my call. i am a republican, i'm a gun owner, former n.r.a. member and i'm also treated for depression. host: why a former n.r.a. member? caller: the day after the presidential election, i was contacted by the n.r.a. -- if you know anything about the n.r.a., if you are a member, they do contact you quite often, mail, via phone calls, asking for money. and more money. and w
the democratic loaf. we recognize we have to have a suspicion of government. this is why i resonate with my conservative brothers. martin luther king jr. was under fbi surveillance until the day he died. government can be oppressive, vicious, ugly, violate your rights, generate propaganda. we need that, too. government can be affirmative, if they are helping poor and working people. government can help use its power for elites. when they come together with no accountability whatsoever, not just politically, but economically. let me say this. martin luther king jr. today could be taken to jail without due process or judicial process under the national defense authorization act because he had a connection with a freedom fighter, nelson mandela. he just got off the terrorist list in 2008. he had a relation to a terrorist. under the present administration, and you can take americans to jail without due process. the black freedom movement has always been suspicious of it. we have black prisoners in their precisely because they were willing to tell the truth that was a threat and we do not talk a
-business customers and others who do not know what their tax rates are going to be or what areas the government may cut back on spending. it is a difficult position for people to wait in. even if they are seen profitability and growth in their business, they are trying to get by with what they haven't been rather than commit to -- with what a house rather than commit to new investments. >> you know how much of a world of participation rate is going to play in unemployment going forward? we have seen a sort of stabilization. will it hit the bottom? and have all of the we're factors played out and now it is just demographics? >> one dindane -- one thing that surprised everybody and one of the reasons we have had a lot of progress on the unemployment rate is past years we have not seen a lot of people re-enter the labour force. participation rates have been pretty much trending down. there is some stabilization that we are seeing now and some are speculating that we might see a little more reentry, but there are varying opinions on that. some on the committee are expecting a lot of people to re- enter
of some agency in government, a set of principles emerge that there was not universal agreement on, but overwhelming consensus on. they were the foundation of the recommendations. if you will permit me another 10-12 minutes, i want to lay out to you what they are from the perspective of the president the first foundational principles is there is a second amendment. -- from the perspective of the president and me. it comes with the right of law- abiding responsible citizens who own guns. the second foundational principles, certain people in society should not and can be disqualified from being able to own a gun because they are unstable or they are dangerous. they are not the citizens but the vast majority of gun owners comprise. 3, we should make common sense judgments about keeping dangerous weapons off of our streets. clearly within the purview of the government, at the same time recognizing, honoring, and being compliant with the second amendment. four, this is not just about guns. it is about our culture. whether it is with video games, movies, or behavior. it is about the abil
on the national mall through the association that governance the national mall. that's a bridge we'll cross when we come to it. but there are a number of civic-minded things to do if we are lucky to have access funds when it is all said and done. >> cnn. how many law enforcement agencies and officers will be involved in the security on the day of the inauguration? and also, how large of an area will be closed off with street closures? >> first, to answer your question, we cannot go into detail as to how many law enforcement officers will be present for the inauguration. and could you repeat your second question for me? >> how many agencies? >> i can't go into detail. >> how much will be closed off. >> we have road closures in effect and i can provide you with information on those. >> [inaudible question] veragets with all events that happen on the capitol complex, we train constantly to address them. as far as specific threats, i can't answer that right now, but just know that united states capitol police with our law enforcement partners have trained constantly in regards to issues that may com
to rebuild the ability to govern. [applause] >> if you could make it work, i am in. if you could get your side to do it, i am in. that is a very good proposal. >> check it out and tell me how many of your folks are willing to visit. i will find republicans to make sure that happens. >> i love it. [applause] >> when you are all reflecting together, try to come up with strategies of how you can sever the link with those who control both of your party. [applause] >> i will let rose and say what she wants to say. my warning to the camera operators, i will walk in front of her to get out to the audience to talk to our special guests. they are everyday american people. the truth is americans, our fellow citizens, are doing the best they can with what they have and where they are. every single day. the fight back without government help coming through, on the evil of austerity is real. >> i was glad i was here. one of the things that is usually absent, there is an effort with the hon neo-liberal agenda, everything should be for sale, to vilify teachers, to vilify anything public. the corporation
the government accountable to the people. few of us agree with everything that is done or spoken under protection of our first amendment rights, our freedom of the press. but as a son of vermont printers and publishers, you can bet that i have very serious concerns about the press being shut out. of course i oppose the disclosure of properly classified government information, but i think we have to make sure that legislative efforts to protect or prevent classified leaks don't ink fringe upon our fundamental freedoms, including the freedom of the press. and there i might say to the administration as i have said to past administrations, don't overclassify things. don't put a classification on everything that you do, including those things where you want to cover your mistakes. this is an open and free country. let's keep it that way. so i'll keep pushing to update our privacy laws, to address emerging technology and the internet, including the electronic communications privacy act. we have to re-authorize satellite, tv licenses. we have to make most accessible for those with visual disabilities. w
one, there was -- world war i, cooperation among central banks and governments was not very good. your audience may know about the tariff wars and all the things that happened. in a global crisis like this one, it is important to cooperate, according it as much as possible with policy makers around the world. -- cooperate as much as possible with policy makers around the world. on one date, five or six of the world's largest central banks' coordinated on an interest-rate cut. we of work with the central banks to make sure that they have enough dollars to lend for banks that need to use dollars in their transactions. cooperation has been very helpful in the latest episode. one less thing that occurs to me. one reason that the fed and other policymakers did not take more aggressive fundamental action to try to end the great depression was, they were afraid to do anything that was unorthodox. there was the gold standard, the whole variety of standard practices. given the great uncertainties , they often maintained very orthodox approach. the personnel change that in the united states was
, expansive government." the chairwoman of the house republican conference said "the president's out word words must be matched with actions regarding the country's fiscal health," suggesting a gulf between the two." good morning, your thoughts on the inaugural address? caller: i thought that it was wonderful. i thought that the speech was very insightful. the keylieve that's words were we the people. together we will do all the things we set out to do. host: he talked about preserving medicare, social security. he talked about climate change, equal rights for gay couples and women. is that your priority list? caller: maybe not in that order, but the president has a hard job and congress has got to work together with him. i believe that we have good republicans. many people in the country believed in the position of the president and that the congress will go along, eventually. host: all right, douglas. your priority list? top five? top three? caller code jobs, education, and for the end of the war. -- caller: jobs, education, for the war to end. host: let's hear the president speaking on
are approaching a number of other fiscal critical watersheds coming up. we have the funding of the government, the so-called sequester, number of spending cuts that were laid as part of the fiscal cliff of arrangement. and we have the infamous debt ceiling that will come into play. we will see a lot of activity in the next few months, debates about the purpose of the government, about the size of the deficit, and a lot of back- and-forth over these three issues. i want to say one word about the debt ceiling. not many people understand what the debt ceiling is about. raising the debt ceiling, which congress has to do periodically, gives the government the ability to pay its existing bills. it doesn't create new deficits. it does not create new spending. so not raising the debt ceiling is sort of like a family, which is trying to improve its credit rating, shane, i know how we can improve our credit rating. we will pay your credit card bills. that is not the best way to improve your credit rating. all of these issues are important, but it is very important that congress take necessary action to
indoor and know the importance of making sure our government protect and serve those who protect and serve us. as an attorney and as the dean as one of the top public interest law schools, i run an institution that permits access to justice and seek to train the next generation of leaders and public servants. as a candidate for michigan secretary of state in 2010, early support from emily's list helped me to raise my voice and share my story. a stopper came to michigan, looked me in the eye and she said she knew i had it in me to win. thanks to her support, i was able to earn more votes than any other democratic candidate in the state and become the highest democratic votes debtor in michigan in 2010. -- vote getter in 2010. this means early support an early investment in young female candidates. it means nurturing us, our careers, and strengthening our ability to lead. it also means recognizing that our vote is our voice. we must work, each one of us must work come to make sure that women run and vote. women voters everywhere are informed and engaged, ready to participate. liste
, there are international governing bodies or international authorities that said over them and the efforts are attempting to expand the population of countries that participate. generally, we see participation of more countries. host: looking at fourth graders, we see reading and math skills has improved and science has improvedun changed. guest: this particular grab it does not show everything. if we look across the entire distribution, we still lowest performing u.s. students with scores that have improved over time. there is a story of improvement among the subjects. this is something we also see in our national assessments. in the u.s., we have seen in mathematics and elsewhere, improvements for our younger students. host:tom lovelss, when you see these numbers, what does it tell you? guest: they bounce around from administration to administration. i think it is wise to take a longer view. i like to look at scores over a longer period of time like a decade or more. if you go back to 1995 and look at the fourth and eighth grade, the u.s. has made steady progress. i am encouraged by these scores. host:
is not whether our government is too big or too small, but whether it works, whether it helps families find jobs at a decent wage, care they can afford, a retirement that is dignified. whether the answer is yes, we intend to move forward. where the answer is no, programs will end. and those of us who manage the public's dollars will be held to account to spend wisely, reform bad habits, and do our business in the light of day because only then can we restore the vital trust between a people and their government. nor is the question before us whether the market is a force for good or ill. its power to generate wealth and expand freedom is unmatched, but this crisis has reminded us that without a watchful eye, the market can spin out of control. a nation cannot prosper long when it favors only the prosperous. the success our economy has always depended not just on the size of our gdp, but on the reach of our prosperity, on our ability to extend opportunity to every willing heart not out of charity, but because it is the surest route to common good. as for our common defense, we reject as false the
. that is the reason. if the government had a list of who has guns, the belief is that if a tyrant or tyrannical rule of law makers takes over, they know who to go for to take away guns. that is to take away freedom. it is a longstanding belief. this is also what informed people, touching on the immigration issue, people who did not want to have a national id card, something that will weed out illegal immigrants if you have an id card, a lot of people believe that that is an infringement of rights as well. the have centralized lists, that is one libertarian and other people began to get worried about government power. i believe the instant background checks, there are rules about how long the government to keep the intermission of who applied for a gun permit -- who has been able to purchase any firearm under that were so great about the government having the list that are required to get rid of the ever mission or dispose of it within a time. . -- within a time period. host: lloyd is joining us from pennsylvania on the republican line. caller: there are two items i want to try to do quickly. why is
, a government of, and by, and for the people, entrusting each generation to keep safe our founding creed. and for more than two hundred years, we have. through blood drawn by lash and blood drawn by sword, we learned that no union founded on the principles of liberty and equality could survive half- slave and half-free. we made ourselves anew, and vowed to move forward together. together, we determined that a modern economy requires railroads and highways to speed travel and commerce, schools and colleges to train our workers. together, we discovered that a free market only thrives when there are rules to ensure competition and fair play. together, we resolved that a great nation must care for the vulnerable, and protect its people from life's worst hazards and misfortune. through it all, we have never relinquished our skepticism of central authority, nor have we succumbed to the fiction that all society's ills can be cured through government alone. our celebration of initiative and enterprise, our insistence on hard work and personal responsibility, these are constants in our character.
and even government should do. i talked about countries, such as france. innovative people, but government, not so much. you have to speak french. i'm talking about strategies and techniques in different communities. >> is this written for businessmen and women? >> when i wrote my first book for washington, it became a bestseller. this book is written for someone starting out as well as professionals in the business. i have gotten great feedback. one person said that he would require it for reading material and training. also based on these findings, it seems that it will do well around the world. >> why the name change docs international? -- ces international? >> a marketing person suggested it. we changed it so that international people felt comfortable. they are very important for u.s. events. our economy is growing slower than other companies. we want those international people to come here. plus, they spend money here. plus, why company should go abroad when buyers can come here? the ces is much more the consumer electronics. we get the ceos and that top marketing people from virtuall
of their surviving -- [inaudible] >> what this government has done is, first of all,tive the biggest -- give the biggest increase in the state pension of five pounds, 30 last year. we've kept the cold weather payments at the high level, and we're replacing the warm front scheme, and while that helps something like 80,000 houses a year, the eco could help up to 230,000 houses a year. that is what we're doing, and it's a record we should be proud of. >> thank you, mr. speaker. the prime minister should know that the ons have recently released figures that show there were 24,000 extra cold weather deaths over the winter of 2010-2012. the majority of those who perished were over the age of 75. so, mr. speaker, can i ask the prime minister if he thinkshis governnt should do more to help the elderly and the vulnerable and less to help millionaires with tax cuts? >> as i just said, we are doing more to help elderly and the vulnerable. a record state increase, bigger than what the party opposite would have done keeping cold weather payments at the higher level that the last
activity and snatch those illegal guns off the streets of america. somehow the government is going to do something that causes everyone to be armed, that we are marching down the street, coming after guns, is a whole lot of nonsense. the people who are not dealing in the reality of what i and achieve and what many other states on a daily basis. we have real jobs, with real responsibilities, trying to make folks say. -- our folks say. we need to have a serious conversation about these issues. thank you. >> thank you very much, mayor. [applause] our next group, we asked people try to hear, the first is ms. barbara lee from california. when you are responding to this group, if you would like to comment on the earlier questions, please feel free. >> thank you. my heartfelt condolences go to the families of your loved ones and to the entire newtown community. i am from oakland california. our thoughts and prayers are to you. 15 of my constituents were shot last week. could you please give us an idea of what cities and police officers and mares confront in terms of daily gun violence? >> i wan
the government running. it will be planned to slowly but surely, what our nation out of debt, deficit, and declined garrett on your behalf, we will insist the democrats who run the rest of washington to the same. this debate is often argued in numbers and figures but it is really about and families like yours that bear the burden of a slow economy. constant uncertainty and. ever-changing government rules chase our jobs and opportunities overseas. when day to day life costs more and jobs pay less, we do not solve the problem by delaying our cattle decision -- spending decisions, raising taxes, or refusing to answer the most pressing economic challenges. with the swearing in of a new congress and the inauguration of president obama, this is an opportunity for a fresh start. government debt affects all of us. republicans will not to to provide a blank check for uncontrolled spending and constant nickel and dime tax increases. we should gut washington's budget, your budget. these are the challenges of our times. we have the guidance of great leaders in the past who have faced tougher chal
and impedes the federal government from doing its most important job, protecting its citizens when calamity strikes. on the surface, mr. speaker, new york city appears to be back up and running, but many people are still homeless anti-lack of long-term housing for which -- a problem for which we do not have an answer. the restoration of heat and power remains a challenge. there are increasing reports of people including small children getting sick from exposure to toxic mold, sewage, and other substances. entire neighbors are still dark and abandoned. many businesses in lower manhattan are still paying off loans from the world trade center 10 years ago. many of these businesses were already operating at thin margins. now they have been hit again. and without additional resources, many of them may close for good. the needs are great and yet the house has still failed to act. back in december the senate passed a $60.4 billion disaster aid package that tracked very closely to the administration's request which was based on conservative assessments of needs across the region. the house could ha
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